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iOS iPhone Dice Game Simulates Real Dice Rolling Using Sensors and Physics

Discussion in 'Games' started by Robby, Jul 10, 2008.

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  1. Robby

    Robby The Robot

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2004
    Location:
    Terra
    iPhone Dice Game Simulates Real Dice Rolling Using Sensors and Physics

    [​IMG]This Dice game is by far the coolest game I've seen, and it's got amazing tech inside which takes advantage of the iPhone's sensors like no other app. Here's how it works: You shake the iPhone and it rolls the dice inside, which you use to play poker. But instead of using some dumb random number generator, it captures your hand's motion and rolls simulated collisions between the virtual dice. This game is great but its just a sampling of the tech from Fullpower, the company Philippe Kahn, creator of the camera phone in 1997, has been developing in stealth for 5 years until today. Yes, this is the tip of a giant iceberg full of gadgets exactly aware of what we're doing with them at all times.

    [​IMG]

    Fullpower is, at its heart, an advanced sensor data processing company. This game is using Fullpower's Motion X tech, which is used to simulate physics, predict motion patterns, and process sensor data. To put it pretty simply, it does "for motion what speech recognition does for voice." While a Wii just takes raw sensor data, a motion X layer can simply detect whether or a gadget is being carried in a pocket or in a hand and also distinguish whether that person is walking or running or driving in a car. Or sensing that a person with a pacemaker is walking quickly and up their heart rate. Fullpower also applies this same sort of interpretation to every kind of sensor you can think of: light, camera, pressure, heart rate, GPS, audio, temperature, etc. Using motion sensors in conjunction with a camera's data could help optimize the timing at the moment a person's wavering hands are at their stillest.

    They're not going to make many products directly, but are working with a bunch of companies to put all of this tech in tomorrow's gadgets to make them more aware of what we're doing.

    For now, enjoy the game.




    (Via Gizmodo)
     
  2. Kevin

    Kevin Code Monkey Staff Abductee

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2004
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Actually, that looks like it'd be a cool app' for modern day D&D players.
     

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