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US sues Apple, publishers over electronic books

Discussion in 'Books' started by Alien Soup, Apr 11, 2012.

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  1. Alien Soup

    Alien Soup Head Chef

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    Oct 20, 2007
    US sues Apple, publishers over electronic books

    The U.S. government filed an antitrust lawsuit against Apple Inc. and book publishers Wednesday, saying the publishers conspired with Apple to raise retail electronic-book prices to limit competition.

    The government also filed papers in U.S. District Court in Manhattan saying it had reached a settlement with publishers Hachette, HarperCollins and Simon & Schuster. It will proceed with its lawsuit against Apple and other publishers, including Holtzbrinck Publishers, doing business as Macmillan, and The Penguin Publishing Co. Ltd., doing business as Penguin Group.

    The lawsuit said the effort was a response to the success Amazon.com had in selling e-books for just under $10. The alleged conspiracy came as Apple was preparing to launch the iPad and called for Apple to be guaranteed a 30 percent commission on each e-book it sold, the lawsuit said.

    "To effectuate their conspiracy, the publisher defendants teamed up with defendant Apple, which shared the same goal of restraining retail price competition in the sale of e-books," the lawsuit said.

    Apple did not immediately respond to a comment request.

    Macmillan Chief Executive Officer John Sargent said in a letter to authors, illustrators and agents that the company has not settled because it is "hard to settle a lawsuit when you know you have done no wrong."

    He said: "Macmillan did not act illegally. Macmillan did not collude."

    Sargent said the filing of the lawsuit came after discussions with the Department of Justice that lasted months.

    "But the terms the DOJ demanded were too onerous. After careful consideration, we came to the conclusion that the terms could have allowed Amazon to recover the monopoly position it had been building before our switch to the agency model," he said. "We also felt the settlement the DOJ wanted to impose would have a very negative and long term impact on those who sell books for a living, from the largest chain stores to the smallest independents."

    At the heart of the e-book pricing debate is the industry's ongoing concerns about Amazon. Publishers see the "agency model" as their best, short-term hope against preventing the online retailer from dominating the e-book market and driving down the price of books to a level unsustainable for publishers and booksellers.

    Since launching the Kindle in 2007, Amazon has made a point of offering best-sellers for $9.99. The discount is so deep from list prices of $20 and more that it's widely believed Amazon is selling the e-books at a loss as a way of attracting more customers and forcing competitors to lower their prices. Amazon also has been demanding higher discounts from publishers and stopped offering e-books from the Independent Publishers Group, a Chicago-based distributor, after they couldn't agree to terms.

    When Apple launched its tablet computer two years ago, publishers saw two ways to balance Amazon's power: Enough readers would prefer Apple's shiny tablet over the Kindle to cut into Amazon's sales and the agency model would stabilize prices.

    Apple's iBookstore has yet to become a major force, but publishers believes the new price model has reduced Amazon's market share from around 90 percent to around 60 percent, with Barnes & Noble's Nook in second at 25 percent. The iBookstore is believed to have 10 to 15 percent.

    Macmillan's Sargent has found himself at the heart of the dispute. In early 2010, as publishers were trying to get Amazon to agree to Apple's pricing system, Amazon pulled all the listings for Macmillan books, from Jonathan Franzen's "The Corrections" to Barbara Ehrenreich's "Nickle and Dimed." Sargent refused to back down and Amazon eventually gave in.

    New e-books from Macmillan and the other publishers investigated by the Justice Department often are priced initially between $12.99 and $14.99, with Amazon making a point of noting that the price was set by the publisher. Ironically, publishers usually make less money off the agency model than the traditional one because they receive a smaller percentage of the proceeds.

    Random House Inc. was the only "big six" publisher not to agree to the agency model in 2010 and was not part of the lawsuit. But the publisher of Dan Brown, John Grisham and others did agree to terms with Apple last year and now must decide whether to keep prices the same, cut them to keep up with competitors or drop the agency model altogether. Random House spokesman Stuart Applebaum , the only of the big six publishers not involved in the case , said Random would have no comments Wednesday.

    According to court papers, the settlement agreement reached with three publishers said the companies agreed that for two years they will not restrict, limit or impede an e-book retailer's ability to set, alter or reduce the retail price of any electronic book. It said the retailers will be able to offer price discounts and other forms or promotions to encourage consumers to buy one or more electronic books.

    The agreement also calls for the defendants not to enter into any agreement or conspiracy with any electronic-book publisher to raise, stabilize, fix, set or coordinate the retail price or wholesale price of any electronic book.


    Source: http://www.philly.com/philly/busine...ussuesapplepublishersoverelectronicbooks.html
     
  2. Alien Soup

    Alien Soup Head Chef

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    UPDATE: The LA Times is explicitly specifying that Steve Jobs himself was involved.

    Former Apple Inc. Chief Executive Steve Jobs and top executives at five major book publishers illegally conspired to raise the prices of e-books, costing consumers tens of millions of dollars, federal and state officials alleged in antitrust suits filed Wednesday.

    The collusion began in 2009 and price fixing took effect with the launch of the iPad in early 2010, boosting the average cost of e-books by $2 to $3 each "virtually overnight," said Sharis Pozen, the acting head of the Justice Department's antitrust division.

    "We allege that these executives knew full well what they were doing. That is, taking steps to make sure the prices consumers paid for e-books were higher," she said in announcing the federal suit.

    "'The customer pays a little more, but that's what you want anyway,'" Pozen quoted Jobs as saying at one point in the negotiations with publishers.

    The suit said Apple proudly described the price-fixing plan -- which gave the iPad maker a guaranteed 30% commission on each e-book it sold through its online marketplace -- as an "aikido move," referring to the Japanese martial art.

    ...

    Apple and the publishers "reached an agreement whereby retail price competition would cease (which all the conspirators desired), retail e-book prices would increase significantly (which the publisher defendants desired) and Apple would be guaranteed a 30% 'commission' on each e-book it sold (which Apple desired)," the suit said.
    Source: http://www.latimes.com/business/tec...publishers-20120411,0,3774448.story?track=rss
     
  3. astonwest

    astonwest Writing Fool Writer

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    Now we get to find out whether Apple has been working on a way to bring Jobs back from the dead?
     
  4. Kevin

    Kevin Code Monkey Staff Abductee

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    Or maybe he really isn't dead at all but has become a recluse, ala Howard Hughes, in a secret bunker attended to by an army of doctors & nurses who don't know the real identify of their only patient. :tinfoilhat:


    On a more serious note... :D I am a bit surprised to see Jobs mentioned by name in the allegations. Usually at this stage there'd be innuendos & mention of actions by unnamed corporate executives who did the conspiring and not attributed quotes.
     
  5. Alien Soup

    Alien Soup Head Chef

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    Australia may be planning on taking action also.
     
  6. Kevin

    Kevin Code Monkey Staff Abductee

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    I just wonder what the outcome will be for customers.... cheaper e-book prices on iOS devices? A refund made to purchasers? Apple just pays a fine and nothing else changes?
     
  7. astonwest

    astonwest Writing Fool Writer

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    Supposedly, they're talking about a refund to customers who got ripped off...but hopefully long term it will mean cheaper e-book prices all-around. If memory serves, Amazon was basically forced into accepting the agency model (where publishers dictate the price that retailers can charge) from all the publishers that were (allegedly) colluding with Apple.

    Joe Konrath covered the many reasons why the alternative (the wholesale model) was better all around for both authors and consumers here.
     

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