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Abell 2218: A Galaxy Cluster Lens

Discussion in 'Tech, Science, and Space' started by Robby, Feb 10, 2008.

  1. Robby

    Robby The Robot

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    Abell 2218: A Galaxy Cluster Lens
    Credit: Andrew Fruchter (STScI) et al., WFPC2, HST, NASA

    Explanation: Gravity can bend light, allowing huge clusters of galaxies to act as telescopes. Almost all of the bright objects in this Hubble Space Telescope image are galaxies in the cluster known as Abell 2218. The cluster is so massive and so compact that its gravity bends and focuses the light from galaxies that lie behind it. As a result, multiple images of these background galaxies are distorted into long faint arcs -- a simple lensing effect analogous to viewing distant street lamps through a glass of wine. The cluster of galaxies Abell 2218 is itself about three billion light-years away in the northern constellation of the Dragon (Draco). The power of this massive cluster telescope has allowed astronomers to detect a galaxy at redshift 5.58, the most distant galaxy yet measured. This young, still-maturing galaxy is faintly visible to the lower right of the cluster core.




    (Via NASA)
     
  2. Kevin

    Kevin Code Monkey Staff Abductee

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    Is that the USS Voyager in the middle of that pic? HHHmm.....
     

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