Carnivore Robots On The Prowl?

Kevin

Code Monkey
Staff member
Joined
Mar 20, 2004
OK, that thread title is little "National Inquirer"-esque but bear with me on this one. While browsing my morning news I came across an article that instantly grabbed my attention: A robot powered by eating flies! :eek:

From CNN: http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/12/27/explorers.ecobot/index.html

Scientists at the University of the West of England (UWE) have designed a robot that does not require batteries or electricity to power itself. Instead, it generates energy by catching and eating houseflies.

Dr Chris Melhuish and his Bristol-based team hope the robot, called EcoBot II, will one day be sent into zones too dangerous for humans, potentially proving invaluable in military, security and industrial areas.

Melhuish, who is director of the Intelligent Autonomous Systems Lab at the UWE, told CNN that the EcoBot II was a result of a quest for an intelligent robot that could function without human supervision.

"That means they need energy. It is one thing to have a robot getting its energy from a household socket, or maybe from the factory floor, but it is another thing when the robot goes outside buildings," he said.

"Of course, there is solar energy outside. Little robots can use solar energy to move about. But mostly, if there is not a lot of solar energy about, you have to give robots batteries -- which eventually run out."

The EcoBot II powers itself in much the same way as animals feed themselves to get their energy, he said.

At this stage, EcoBot II is a "proof-of-concept" robot and travels only at roughly 10 centimeters per hour.

But the self-sustaining robot had the potential to be used in conditions that were not suitable for humans, said Melhuish.

"In the future, I think we are going to want robots to go to places that we don't want to go. In order to do that, it's unlikely that these robots are going to have sufficient energy to carry out their tasks," he said.

The EcoBot II uses human sewage as bait to catch the insects. It then digests the flies, before their exoskeletons are turned into electricity, which enables the robot to function.

Bacteria in the sewage eats the flies' soft tissues, which releases enzymes that break down the hardened shell.

Sugar molecules released from the broken-down shell are then absorbed and used as energy by the bacteria.

"The robot then has the energy to carry out some example tasks which in this case include moving towards light, measuring temperature. It has a temperature sensor. It could be anything, but we have chosen temperature," Melhuish said.

"Then it transmits that temperature information over a radio link to a base station a couple of meters away and it does that all using the energy from insect or plant material."
I wonder how long before these things start being sold on informercials at 2:00am as a household appliance? ;)
 

Tom

An Old Friend
Joined
Dec 6, 2004
Location
Gulf Coast
I wonder where the cutoff will be...flies, grasshoppers, mice, ...men. Just how hungry could a robot get? It may not be a good idea to develop this technology in an area where AI could also exist. An AI wouldn't wait for the fly-it would actively seek it. and anything like the fly that could be turned into energy.
Just remember, I warned ya!
 

Kevin

Code Monkey
Staff member
Joined
Mar 20, 2004
skwirlinator said:
I wonder where the cutoff will be...flies, grasshoppers, mice, ...men. Just how hungry could a robot get? It may not be a good idea to develop this technology in an area where AI could also exist. An AI wouldn't wait for the fly-it would actively seek it. and anything like the fly that could be turned into energy.
Just remember, I warned ya!
"It's people! Don't you understand? Soylent Green is people!"

Yeah, I'm not to sure I want to run into an intelligent device that is not only smarter than me, but is looking at me as dinner.

This thread reminds me, speaking of robots & AI, I still haven't watched I, Robot yet. Hey, Brian, if you're reading this..... can I borrow your copy? :D
 
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