How come we don't hear about recent alien abductions?

ByGoneYrs

Gaelic Oracle
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Sep 25, 2017
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USA, Southern New Jersey
So have they state that we humans are a natural race or were we engineered by others to develop into the race we are now? What have they stated about the human races purpose or direction in the scope of things?
 

sci-fi-dude

1963, 1899 called they want every thing back....
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You know what this thread reminds me of?
Exidor of course, I knew a dude just like him, man he was out there!
 

ByGoneYrs

Gaelic Oracle
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Sep 25, 2017
Location
USA, Southern New Jersey
You know Powerball jackpot for tonight is $128 million (thus $79.9 million cash value) I bought my tickets, have you...LOL!!! Hey it is a pipe-dream I know, but it is still fun to dream. Hmmm I wonder if that little green alien in front of me, how many it bought?
 

sci-fi-dude

1963, 1899 called they want every thing back....
Joined
Jul 20, 2017
Location
DFW
So have they state that we humans are a natural race or were we engineered by others to develop into the race we are now? What have they stated about the human races purpose or direction in the scope of things?
Aliens created us? LOL!
 

ByGoneYrs

Gaelic Oracle
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Location
USA, Southern New Jersey
This isn't such a far fetched idea as one may think. If you look at our Genetic makeup, we are different from every other creature from this planet. We might have alien DNA introduced into our DNA to make us into what we are currently. There are some markers that are totally unique.
 

Kevin

Code Monkey
Staff member
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Location
Pennsylvania
Aliens created us? LOL!
This isn't such a far fetched idea as one may think. If you look at our Genetic makeup, we are different from every other creature from this planet. We might have alien DNA introduced into our DNA to make us into what we are currently. There are some markers that are totally unique.
Plus there's the Panspermia train of thought that envisions life on a planet could be the result of striking asteroids carrying organisms on them. In that scenario aliens might not have been the direct genesis of intelligent life on Earth but we and the aliens might have some common microscopic ancestry.
 

Tom

An Old Friend
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Dec 6, 2004
Location
Gulf Coast
This isn't such a far fetched idea as one may think. If you look at our Genetic makeup, we are different from every other creature from this planet. We might have alien DNA introduced into our DNA to make us into what we are currently. There are some markers that are totally unique.
That is a consideration, however, there is a billion or so species on this planet that also have markers that are not shared by other species. An elephant shares very few genetic markers with a jelly fish, a spider or an amebae. It doesn't mean other animals are aliens tho. Why would it mean that we are?

If you look at the taxonomy of homo sapiens, you can see how humans ARE related to other "like" organisms.
We humans share makeup with:

Domain: Eukaryota
(unranked): Unikonta
(unranked): Opisthokonta
(unranked): Holozoa
(unranked): Filozoa
Kingdom: Animalia
Subkingdom: Eumetazoa
Clade: Bilateria
Clade: Nephrozoa
Superphylum: Deuterostomia
Phylum: Chordata
Clade: Craniata
Subphylum: Vertebrata
Infraphylum: Gnathostomata
Clade: Eugnathostomata
Clade: Teleostomi
Superclass: Tetrapoda
Clade: Reptiliomorpha
Clade: Amniota
Clade: Synapsida
Clade: Mammaliaformes
Class: Mammalia
Clade: Eutheria
Infraclass: Placentalia
Clade: Exafroplacentalia
Magnorder: Boreoeutheria
Superorder: Euarchontoglires
Grandorder: Euarchonta
Mirorder: Primatomorpha
Order: Primates
Suborder: Haplorhini
Infraorder: Simiiformes
Parvorder: Catarrhini
Superfamily: Hominoidea
Family: Hominidae
Subfamily: Homininae
Tribe: Hominini
Genus: Homo
Species: H. sapiens
Subspecies: H. s. sapiens
Trinomial name
Homo sapiens sapiens

Then you can further trace your specific genetic makeup back along your family tree.

Our current species genetic makeup is a 'mutation' which has occurred over millions of years.
We are not a pristine example but more of a current rendition.

This is all scientific knowledge that is accepted as reality.

Baloney Detection Kit ~ Carl Sagan
1. How reliable is the source of the claim?
2. Does this source often make similar claims?
3. Have the claims been verified by another source?
4. How does the claim fit with what we know about how the world works?
5. Has anyone gone out of the way to disprove the claim, or has only supportive evidence
been sought?
6. Does the preponderance of evidence point to the claimant's conclusion or to a
different one?
7. Is the claimant employing the accepted rules of reason and tools of research, or have
these been abandoned in favor of others that lead to the desired conclusion?
8. Is the claimant providing an explanation for the observed phenomena or merely
denying the existing explanation?
9. If the claimant proffers a new explanation, does it account for as many phenomena as
the old explanation did?
10. Do the claimant's personal beliefs and biases drive the conclusions, or vice versa?

Occam's Razor ~ wiki
Occam's razor (or Ockham's razor) is a principle from philosophy.
Suppose there exist two explanations for an occurrence.
In this case the simpler one is usually better.
Another way of saying it is that the more assumptions you have to make, the more unlikely an explanation is.
Occam's razor applies especially in the philosophy of science, but also more generally.

Simple Wiki said:
A problem with Occam's razor is that the sentence is not really about things (entia = entities), but about explanations or hypotheses. So other thinkers have come up with other versions:

"We consider it a good principle to explain the phenomena by the simplest hypothesis possible".
~ Ptolemy. (Not only is Ptolemy earlier than Occam, but Occam's supposed wording cannot be found in any of his existing works.)

"We are to admit no more causes of natural things other than such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearances. Therefore, to the same natural effects we must, so far as possible, assign the same causes". ~ Isaac Newton.

"Whenever possible, substitute constructions out of known entities for inferences to unknown entities". ~ Bertrand Russell.

In science, Occam's razor is used as a heuristic (general guiding rule or an observation) to guide scientists.
 

Tom

An Old Friend
Joined
Dec 6, 2004
Location
Gulf Coast
Plus there's the Panspermia train of thought that envisions life on a planet could be the result of striking asteroids carrying organisms on them. In that scenario aliens might not have been the direct genesis of intelligent life on Earth but we and the aliens might have some common microscopic ancestry.
Panspermia is a likely scenario considering that nearly all the water on this planet came from collisions with comets and other water (ice) carrying impacts.
Since science has found no evidence of life arising on other bodies in this system only indicates that it has not yet been found.
The conditions for life to arise is environmentally strict.

Origin of life on Earth: 'Natural' asymmetry of biological molecules may have come from space
Date:
January 7, 2011
Source:
CNRS (Délégation Paris Michel-Ange)
Summary:
Certain molecules do exist in two forms which are symmetrical mirror images of each other: they are known as chiral molecules. On Earth, the chiral molecules of life, especially amino acids and sugars, exist in only one form, either left-handed or right-handed. Why is it that life has initially chosen one form over the other? Now researchers have for the first time obtained an excess of left-handed molecules (and then an excess of right-handedones) under conditions that reproduce those found in interstellar space. This result therefore supports the hypothesis that the asymmetry of biological molecules on Earth has a cosmic origin. The researchers also suggest that the solar nebula formed in a region of massive stars.
‘Building blocks for life' may originate in space
Date:
June 28, 2016
Source:
University of Leiden
Summary:
Amino acids are the building blocks for life on earth. They may originate in space and reach the earth via comets and meteorites.
Looking for life's (lower) limits
Date:
February 6, 2017
Source:
Santa Fe Institute
Summary:
Just how little energy life needs to survive is the subject of a new study. By analyzing maintenance budgets and cellular processes across species and sizes of bacteria, researchers found distinct trends along the spectrum and one surprising constant. Their investigation into the lower bound of energy required for life helps us understand ecological constraints on other planetary bodies in our solar system as well as our own.
 

ByGoneYrs

Gaelic Oracle
Joined
Sep 25, 2017
Location
USA, Southern New Jersey
Now that might explain how life developed here on this earth in the beginning.

Look at the ideas we have about seeding Mars. They want to introduce simple plants like lichen, then moss, and then ferns, and then grasses over time. They also want to other things too over time, but when they start to seed grasses, they would start to seed stuff to the waters too. It all takes time and planning, but it would be a great planet wide experiment for us human.
 

Tom

An Old Friend
Joined
Dec 6, 2004
Location
Gulf Coast
The point I'm making, in case it got lost in the posts, is that all life on Earth may be alien in origin.
Not just Human Beings.

Human beings are set apart because of our intellectual capacity.

We perceive TIME

Past: What was
Present: What is
Future: What could be

We USE this understanding to examine the PAST, in the PRESENT to affect predictable changes in the FUTURE.
No other animal on this planet does this with the precision or depth of detail of humans.
Other animals store food or make preparations for events. Bears, dolphins, even ants. Humans built a social culture on it.
 

Kevin

Code Monkey
Staff member
Joined
Mar 20, 2004
Location
Pennsylvania
Now that might explain how life developed here on this earth in the beginning.

Look at the ideas we have about seeding Mars. They want to introduce simple plants like lichen, then moss, and then ferns, and then grasses over time. They also want to other things too over time, but when they start to seed grasses, they would start to seed stuff to the waters too. It all takes time and planning, but it would be a great planet wide experiment for us human.
In honor of Matt Damon they should send some potato plants. :D
 

Tom

An Old Friend
Joined
Dec 6, 2004
Location
Gulf Coast
Now that might explain how life developed here on this earth in the beginning.

Look at the ideas we have about seeding Mars. They want to introduce simple plants like lichen, then moss, and then ferns, and then grasses over time. They also want to other things too over time, but when they start to seed grasses, they would start to seed stuff to the waters too. It all takes time and planning, but it would be a great planet wide experiment for us human.
Yes, something similar happened on Earth. It could be done.
Problem is, it takes BILLIONS of years for it to reach our current level of biosphere and even what we currently have is incredibly fragile.

The problems with Mars is the lack of magnetosphere.
Solar radiation will KILL life.
Mars' Core would need to be melted and set to motion first.
 

Tom

An Old Friend
Joined
Dec 6, 2004
Location
Gulf Coast
NASA said:
Radiation, at its most basic, is simply waves or sub-atomic particles that transports energy to another entity – whether it is an astronaut or spacecraft component. The main concern in space is particle radiation. Energetic particles can be dangerous to humans because they pass right through the skin, depositing energy and damaging cells or DNA along the way. This damage can mean an increased risk for cancer later in life or, at its worst, acute radiation sickness during the mission if the dose of energetic particles is large enough.

Fortunately for us, Earth’s natural protections block all but the most energetic of these particles from reaching the surface. A huge magnetic bubble, called the magnetosphere, which deflects the vast majority of these particles, protects our planet. And our atmosphere subsequently absorbs the majority of particles that do make it through this bubble. Importantly, since the International Space Station (ISS) is in low-Earth orbit within the magnetosphere, it also provides a large measure of protection for our astronauts.
But a journey to Mars requires astronauts to move out much further, beyond the protection of Earth's magnetic bubble.

“There’s a lot of good science to be done on Mars, but a trip to interplanetary space carries more radiation risk than working in low-Earth orbit,” said Jonathan Pellish, a space radiation engineer at Goddard.

Throughout the entire trip, astronauts must be protected from two sources of radiation. The first comes from the sun, which regularly releases a steady stream of solar particles, as well as occasional larger bursts in the wake of giant explosions, such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections, on the sun. These energetic particles are almost all protons, and, though the sun releases an unfathomably large number of them, the proton energy is low enough that they can almost all be physically shielded by the structure of the spacecraft.
The second source of energetic particles is harder to shield. These particles come from galactic cosmic rays, often known as GCRs. They’re particles accelerated to near the speed of light that shoot into our solar system from other stars in the Milky Way or even other galaxies. Like solar particles, galactic cosmic rays are mostly protons. However, some of them are heavier elements, ranging from helium up to the heaviest elements. These more energetic particles can knock apart atoms in the material they strike, such as in the astronaut, the metal walls of a spacecraft, habitat, or vehicle, causing sub-atomic particles to shower into the structure. This secondary radiation, as it is known, can reach a dangerous level.

So, it is extremely unlikely humans will be terraforming any planet without a magnetosphere and atmosphere. Viable life is fragile when considering these conditions. Plus, not only would we need to seed the planet with viable life that thrives, we will need to cause conditions so that viable life mutates.
It is useless to have a planet with billions of tardigrades if every single one is in dormancy. A lichen that thrives will continue to thrive as a lichen unless it has some need to mutate. Biodiversity is a complex series of mutations over millions or billions of years.
 

Tom

An Old Friend
Joined
Dec 6, 2004
Location
Gulf Coast
How come we don't hear about recent alien abductions?

Because people have substituted belief based fear with scientific reality.
We are getting smarter.
It is also why there is less attendance at churches and subscription to religious dogma.
Things that don't make sense are more readily dismissed.
Without first-hand experience, skepticism takes priority.
Technology has created a world where anything can be depicted or described.
 

sci-fi-dude

1963, 1899 called they want every thing back....
Joined
Jul 20, 2017
Location
DFW
Plus there's the Panspermia train of thought that envisions life on a planet could be the result of striking asteroids carrying organisms on them. In that scenario aliens might not have been the direct genesis of intelligent life on Earth but we and the aliens might have some common microscopic ancestry.
You said Panspermia, lol
Kevin I'm a Christian, so I'm created by the man upstairs. I like other folks stories, they make for a great read! But my good friend, I'm set in my ways.:):):)
 

Imzadi

Imzadi
Joined
Jan 23, 2013
Location
USA
The reason I am not able to be on this website daily is because I am "elsewhere". :LOL: I am being "taken" daily. My time is not my own. My sleeping is irregular. I didn't sleep at all last night. A couple days ago, I was eating breakfast. I was taken in the middle of breakfast. When I returned, part of my food was eaten. The rest was just where I left it. I was GONE for 4 hours! How CAN anyone write a book with all that going on? I am checking into possibly getting an interview on TV. I hope to get a booking agent.
They seem to let me keep doctor's appointments. I hope they will let me keep appointments with a booking agent, too.
I have been on the radio once, several years ago. :greetings:
The fact that people occasionally try to kill me shows that something is going on. Otherwise, I would be just be a regular retired teacher.
If it weren't for the PROTECTION OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT and the help from the ETs, my life would be a terrible mess.:darkside:
 

Jester

Cadet
Joined
Jun 21, 2018
How come we don't hear about recent alien abductions?

Because people have substituted belief based fear with scientific reality.
We are getting smarter.
It is also why there is less attendance at churches and subscription to religious dogma.
Things that don't make sense are more readily dismissed.
Without first-hand experience, skepticism takes priority.
Technology has created a world where anything can be depicted or described.
People are no less religious today than their ancestors were. It's just the form the religion has changes where comedians become the preachers. The exact same mechanics used in a religious setting are used by TV series like the tonight show. You tune in and learn what the current moral thing is, whats the bad thing and what needs to be shunned as a heretic.

The reason we see less of it is because they have their own platforms now. Instead of going on network TV they go on podcasts or streams. They have discussions among themselves int heir own spheres rather than go on the big stuff and get mocked for it. I'm a big fan of conspiracy podcasts and you regularly hear people writing books on UFO abductions and animal mutilations. If you're not finding it then it's because you're not looking for it.
 
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