How long will humanity be on Earth?

How long will humanity be on Earth?

  • Less than 100 years

    Votes: 2 11.1%
  • 100 to 1,000 years

    Votes: 4 22.2%
  • 1,000 to 10,000 years

    Votes: 5 27.8%
  • 10,000 years to 100,000 years

    Votes: 1 5.6%
  • 100,000 to 1,000,000 years

    Votes: 1 5.6%
  • 1,000,000 years +

    Votes: 5 27.8%

  • Total voters
    18

Kevin

Code Monkey
Staff member
Joined
Mar 20, 2004
Not just radiation, the darkening of the sky across the globe would cause a nuclear winter
Good point. For those areas that didn't get hit with radiation (which the odds are against considering wind studies the past few years) then the eventual lack of vegetation due to a blocked out sun might just have a wee bit of an impact on the food chain.


The world governments all undoubtedly have some kind of Noah's Arks set up in case of extreme disasters...
You may be horrifically surprised
I always find it fascinating learning about some of the bunkers that our government has created in case of modern war on US soil. If the declassified compounds are pretty amazing I'd love to see the current versions.
 

Kevin

Code Monkey
Staff member
Joined
Mar 20, 2004
Yeah, I'll bet they are massive. Problem is, I don't think there are as many as would be needed.
Oh, absolutely! When the big "Boom!" comes you, me, and most everybody we know will be running around like chickens with our heads cut off but you can be sure that the US Gov't, in albeit a smaller form, will survive to poke their heads out of the ground another day.
 

atailofadog

Cadet
Joined
Sep 19, 2008
Hopely not for too long.

(my endearing notion of humanity)

Seriously speaking, I think that humans are going to remain on this planet for quite long a period, unless something suprising happens to happen, for example the becoming of a new ice age, a destructive nuclear war or a meteoroid destroying everything on the planet, including the mankind. A threat of extinction doesn't seem likely, when taking into account the fact that our amount of residents is pretty high and adding to that all the skillfulness of the medical system, health care and science. So probably the answer is more likely to correlate with the faith of Earth.
 

Wolfrunner

Scout
Joined
Mar 12, 2010
Location
Mars
Interesting question. I voted for 1 000 000 +. This because even with all the destructive tendancies we have towards our planet we have an incredible capacity to survive (as a race not individually) just about everything, we are basically like cockroaches, we find a hole to hide in and wait out the destruction to then reemerge to rebuild and reproduce.

When our sun explodes and consumes our planet we'll probably be escaping aboard space ships heading for some distant planetary system but that scenario is a long way or is it, we'll never know until it's to late.
 

BirdOPrey5

Scout
Joined
Jan 1, 2005
Over 2,500 Nukes have been detonated in tests since WW2 and we haven't had Nuclear Winter yet- I seriously doubt even in an all out Nuclear War the fear of "Nuclear Winter" is real... Volcanoes produce more ash and block more sun then many bombs would.
 

ultraviolet

Stealth Assassin
Joined
Sep 28, 2010
Location
Hythe, kent, UK
when the alien race who put cension life on the planet come back to view there results and find nothing worthwhile is happening the earth will be cleaned and they will start again hoping for better lab result in there petri dish

[i might of read to much A C Clarke]
 

cigano

Cadet
Joined
Nov 24, 2011
Location
uae
1thing that sticks in my mind is the fact we have made more progress in the last 150 years than all the years previous. I know there are plenty of rational answers but there is still something that don't sit right about it all.
 

Imzadi

Imzadi
Joined
Jan 23, 2013
Location
USA
:cool::cool: Far beyond our lifetimes! I think the GOOD ETs are watching, and will disclose their presence. It will give us something else to focus our attention on.
The ETs will show us that our hatred for each other due to race, ethnicity, and politics is illogical. :cool::eek::eek::cool:
 

Mirelly

Mouthy Cow
Joined
Mar 12, 2013
Location
UK
meh ... I am trying not to resurrect old threads, but this one is fascinating, and not that old either.

I voted 100-1,000.

I confess to a large degree of cynicism regarding the capability H Sapiens has shown over the last couple of thousand years to drain this planet of natural resources, and in the process desertify whole regions. Meanwhile we are breeding out of control, continue to wage ideological wars on each other, and still haven't found a simple and effective economic model which avoids both the stagnation that usually results from the application of Marxist theory and the damaging boom-bust cycles of capitalism.

Setting aside climate change, the biggest threat we face in the coming centuries is the battle against infections. Medicine has advanced to stage where we take long-life for granted, and few illnesses -- not even cancers -- are the terror or death sentence they once where. But the bugs have evolved resistance to our drugs, and it's been 25 years since the drugs industry came up with new class of antibiotic. Now those drugs have only been around since 1940. Even if we pull a rabbit out of the hat and get a new and effective way to treat infections, we can be sure that the bugs will be able to beat the new weapon within a generation. And if -- when -- civilisation falls, there will be no industry to supply the drugs or the tools; and with the planet already stripped of the resources easily accessible with low technology, it will be from difficult to impossible for civilisation to rise again ... especially in regarding to getting off the ground and into space.

Bleak ain't I? :rolleyes:
 
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