Is it Elena or Yelena?

JackBristow

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Joined
Apr 7, 2003
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CIA HQ
i know in the first ep with katya the third drevko sister was named yelena.
but then in the early S4 eps they were calling Elena.
and now in the last 2 ep's there calling her yelena again.



does anybody know for sure what her real name is acually? has it been confirmed?
 

zjmac

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Joined
Jan 12, 2004
Location
Lexington, KY
According to the text that is used in the closed captioning boxes it is "Yelena." It has been very consistent. Maybe there is a chance that the "Y" is silent or the actors just pronounce it differently different times.

Zach
 

speedroc

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Joined
Oct 22, 2003
zjmac said:
According to the text that is used in the closed captioning boxes it is "Yelena." It has been very consistent. Maybe there is a chance that the "Y" is silent or the actors just pronounce it differently different times.

Zach
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There have been a few times when the text is off. In Remnants for example, Lazaray says "Julian the Covenant is evil", yet the captions read "Julia".When Jack is telling Sloane about the Sentinel, the captions say the russians are looking for Elena Derevko. From time to time you get these little quirks with the captions.
 

Guest8893

Scout
Joined
Dec 14, 2003
Yeah the captions are confusing... and I don't understand anything about Yelena. I think I missed the first episode where she was mentioned (so sad... :() did they just mention her name or what?
 

ConcreteGirl

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Joined
Jan 31, 2005
There was Elena in Felicity - and JJ has been known to reuse names for his characters - so I am going with Elena. Not that it makes a big difference, they both sound the same.
 

Celina

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Joined
Feb 28, 2005
According to Chad Darnell, who does the casting it is Elena, according to the episode-descriptions it is also Elena...

Then I guess that's right...
 
Joined
May 19, 2005
Also, I noticed that in tonight's episode, the Closed Caption said "Elena," however, in the previous episodes it was spelled "Yelena." By the way, I'm new to the forum and this is my first post. :D
 

Mountaineer

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Mar 31, 2003
Location
Indiana, USA
I know when I watched it today (recorded it on tivo and then watched it today), Jack was saying Elaina, but when Irina said it, it sounded like Yelena. Maybe because she has a little bit of an accent it sounds different when she says it. That is just my idea.
 
Joined
Jun 19, 2003
Location
Windsor, Ontario, Canada
Are people still talking about this?


In Russia, people understand that Elena and Yelena are close variations of the same name in the same way as English speakers will slip between using "Charles" with "Charlie" or "Chuck", "Anthony" with "Tony", "William" with "Will", Willie", "Bill" and/or "Billy".

Elena is a popular Greek, Slavic, Spanish, Romanian and Italian version of the Greek name Helen (Eleni), meaning "light" and beautiful.

The name has many variants in languages and countries across the world.
Ænor (Provençal)
Aileen (Scottish)
Aili (Estonian), (Finnish)
Alena (Czech), German, Slovakian, (Spanish)
Alenka (Slovenian)
Aliénor (Occitan)
Alyena (Russian)
Alyiona (Russian)
Alyona (Russian)
Ealanor (Gaelic)
Eileanóra (Irish)
Eileen (Irish)
Eilidh (Scottish Gaelic)
Eilonóra (Gaelic)
Elaine (English)
Elea (English)
Eleanor (English)
Eleanora (English)
Eleanore (English)
Eleonóra (Hungarian)
Elen (Welsh)
Elena (Bulgarian), (Greek), (Italian), (Lithuanian), (Macedonian), Manx, (Portuguese), (Romanian), (Russian), (Spanish)
Eleni (Greek)
Elenie (Georgian), (Greek)
Elenka (Czech)
Élénora (French)
Elenora (English)
Eleonoora (Finnish)
Eleonor (English)
Eleonora (German), (Italian), (Polish)
Eléonore (French)
Eleonore (German)
Eli (Norwegian)
Eliana (Portuguese)
Éliane (French)
Eliina (Finnish)
Elin (Welsh)
Elina (Russian), (Finnish)
Eline (Dutch)
Elinor (English)
Elinore (French)
Eliora (Hebrew)
Ella (English), (Finnish)
Elle (English)
Ellen (Danish), (Dutch), (English)
Elli (Finnish)
Ellie (English)
Ellin (Welsh)
Ellinor (Danish), (Finnish), (Norwegian), (Swedish)
Elly (English)
Elna (Danish), (Finnish)
Elnora (English)
Elya (Russian)
Ena (Irish)
Galena (Ukrainian)
Galina (Russian)
Galya (Russian)
Haliana (Polish)
Halina (Polish), (Russian)
Heleen (Dutch)
Heleena (Finnish)
Heleentje (Dutch)
Helena (Czech), (Danish), (Dutch), (English), (Estonian), (Finnish) (German), (Greek), (Latvian), (Norwegian), (Portuguese), (Slovenian), (Swedish)
Hélène (French)
Helene (Danish), (Finnish), (German) (Norwegian), (Swedish)
Helenka (Hungarian)
Heli (Finnish)
Hellae (Greek)
Hellais (Greek)
Hellen (English)
Ileana (Romanian), (Spanish)
Ili (Hungarian)
Iliana (Spanish)
Ilka (Hungarian)
Ilona (Finnish), (Hungarian), (Latvian)
Ilonka (Hungarian)
Iluska (Hungarian)
Jelena (Croatian), (Latvian), (Russian), (Serbian)
Jelka (Croatian), (Slovenian)
Laina (Finnish)
Lainey (English)
Laney (English)
Léan (Irish)
Léana (Irish)
Leanora (English)
Leena (Estonian), (Finnish)
Lele (German)
Lelya (Russian)
Lena (Danish), (English), (Finnish), (German), (Greek), (Norwegian), (Russian), (Swedish)
Lenchen (German)
Lenci (Hungarian)
Lene (Danish), (German), (Norwegian)
Leni (German)
Lenka (Slovenian)
Lenora (English)
Lenore (English)
Lenuta (Romanian)
Leonor (Portuguese), (Spanish)
Leonora (Dutch), (Italian), (Russian), (Spanish)
Leonore (German)
Liina (Finnish)
Lina (Italian)
Line (Dutch)
Liolya (Russian)
Lora (English), Italian
Lore (German)
Nel (Dutch)
Nelda (English)
Nélida (Spanish)
Nell (English)
Nelle (English)
Nelli (Russian), (Finnish, Hungarian)
Nellie (English)
Nelly (English)
Nelya (Russian)
Nóirín (Irish)
Noora (Finnish)
Nora (Basque), (English), (Irish), (Italian)
Norah (English), (Irish)
Noreen (English), (Irish)
Norina (Italian)
Nóra (Hungarian)
Olena (Ukrainian)
Olenka (Ukrainian)
Onella (Hungarian)
Yelena (Russian)

Yelina (Russian)
 
Joined
Jun 19, 2006
What I meant was; Ye, or E (Е, е), is a letter of the Cyrillic alphabet. It looks exactly like the Latin letter E. In Bulgarian, Macedonian, Serbian, and Ukrainian, it is called E, and represents the vowel /e/ or /ɛ/. It is derived from Greek epsilon (Ε, ε). In Belarusian and Russian, it is called Ye and represents a palatalizing vowel, that is, it modifies the letter before it but is otherwise no different from the sound it represents in languages like Bulgarian or Ukrainian . That's why it looks like "Elena" but read as "Yelena" in russian.
 
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