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Some books i got for free..anyone read these?

AlexM

Captain
Joined
Jul 10, 2008
Location
Brooklyn NYC
#1
i just got a copy of Lightby M. John Harrison and The Glass Books of the Dream Eaters by Gordon Dahlquist. they were on the 'free books' cart at my local library. light looks enticing it freatures prominently on the cover a generous rave from neil gaiman so i picked it up. I probably won't get to these for a while, but has anyone read either of these? good? yes, no?
oh, its in my signature but the first two chapters of an SF serial novel im writing are on my blog now, with chapter 3 coming soon. Its sort of a writing experiment, but that doesn't mean im not taking it seriously. i'd appreciate input tahnks
 

Mojo

Rocket Ranger
Joined
Jul 29, 2008
#2
From Amazon:
Harrison's talent for brilliant, reality-bending SF is on display yet again with this three-tiered tale, published (and highly praised) in the U.K. in 2002. It's 1999, and British scientist Michael Kearney and his American partner, Brian Tate, are studying laboratory quantum physics; unbeknownst to them, they'll become the fathers of interplanetary travel. Kearney nervously holds a pair of predictive dice he's stolen from a frightening specter called the Shrander, whom he keeps at bay by committing random murders. Four hundred years in the future, K-ship captain Seria Mau Genlicher has gravely erred in splicing herself with a hijacked spacecraft called the White Cat—and now she wants out. There's also Ed Chianese, a burned-out interstellar surfer now spending his life within a reality simulation machine. His problem? Monetary debt to the nasty Cray sisters. As Kearney continues to narrowly evade the Shrander, he discovers that company CEO Gordon Meadows has sold the lab to Sony. All three story lines converge and find heavenly closure at the cosmological wonder known as the Kefahuchi Tract, a wormhole with alien origins bordered by a vast, astral "beach" where time and space are braided and interchangeable. This is space opera for the intelligentsia, as Harrison (Things That Never Happen) tweaks aspects of astrophysics, fantasy and humanism to hum right along with the blinking holograms in a welcome and long overdue return.
And the user reviews are fairly positive... if you do read this, let me know what you think. It sounds interesting.
 

AlexM

Captain
Joined
Jul 10, 2008
Location
Brooklyn NYC
#3
i just started it. what i've read i is fascinating. it starts in out time and jumps around to 2400 ad and i think other temporal locales. the technological stuff in the first chapter, which is present day, is spot on. I think i'll like this book
you're not gonna believe it but i just got two free books from my local library The Philip k. Dick reader and
minority report and other stories
they were donations and the librarian knew i am a fan of Phil Dick so she let me have them. there in great condition, i think both collections came out in 1987 on citadel press.
 

Mojo

Rocket Ranger
Joined
Jul 29, 2008
#4
Wow, that's sweet. I've never read Minority Report -- obviously I saw the movie -- so if you read that, give me the lowdown.

(y)
 
Joined
Jul 10, 2008
Location
Brooklyn NYC
#5
im halfway through minority report now. i did finish second variety-which the film Screamers was based on. i ll let you know. oh and chapter three of my serail novel is on my blog
 
Joined
Jul 10, 2008
Location
Brooklyn NYC
#6
sorry i havent been on this forum for a spell but heres the lowdown:
Light by M. John Harrison was an excellent book. I think maybe one of the three best i've read this year. it is both acessible to nonSF readers and pleasingly technical for the hard SF fan. i see this book as maybe one of those genre-transcendent classics. i understand there's a sequel called Nova Swing. I'll have to check it out
The Phil Dick anthology was great. the Minority report story was a far cry from the film. The only common denominator being the concept of precrime. the stories in this anthology are some of dicks earliest and best.
Last week I read Greyby Jon Armstrong. I recommend this novel. it is an excellent first effort and its a fun, engaging read.
I also read, or rather re-read, Terminal Cafe by Ian MacDonald. i think this book was called Necroville in the UK. i began to read this book years ago, but never got into it. recently i gave it ascond try and couldn't put it down. Its an interesting take on nanotech and ressurcetion technology. Terminal Cafe, Light and Grey are the three best book i read this year. i enjoy turning people on to books i really liked and these three i have to say, are mandatory readiing.