Would you use a "transporter" if you knew...

Would you use a human transporter?


  • Total voters
    41

Kevin

Code Monkey
Staff member
Joined
Mar 20, 2004
Location
Pennsylvania
#1
... that the basic principle of the design was that a copy of you was actually being created at the other end and not the original you?

Think of the Star Trek transporters and McCoy's concerns about them. Think of the basic principle of what they really do... they break down an item into energy, the energy is put it machine form pattern, the pattern is transmitted to a receiving end, and then at the receiving end that pattern is used to "recreate" the item.

What got me thinking about this was a movie I caught last night that starts off as a drama and about 2/3rds of the way into the story line it turns into sci-fi. I won't give the name of the movie since if you haven't seen it yet then I don't wont to give away any details but if you're curious click the link for the IMDB listing.

So, with the basic premise in mind, would you be willing to walk into a transporter knowing that you will not walk out of the other side but rather a copy of yourself?
 

Tim

Creative Writer
Joined
Jan 16, 2005
Location
England
#3
Idon't believe the scanning process of Star Trek's transporters is a viable option. How could you poissibly keep your brain connections and memories that make your character up?

I prefer a transporting of a bubble of space, a sphere and all it's physical contents. The sphere would swap contents with the other end, and by that process a device for measuring the air content/temperature in that other space would be necessary for security.
Unless two machines are mated, requiring the second half of the pair of machines to be physically transported to the target location first.
 

Black Mathias

Twisted Mentat
Joined
Jun 5, 2007
Location
Under the Sea
#4
I've thought about this before myself, and I can honestly say that I would use it in a second. And while we're at it, why couldn't the copy be improved?

"Transport into a better you...today!"
 

Tim

Creative Writer
Joined
Jan 16, 2005
Location
England
#5
And while we're at it, why couldn't the copy be improved?

"Transport into a better you...today!"

How to deal with all the disabled people in our community you mean? But messing with nature is dangerous. Change something and a rolling effect could happen. Again, the most crucial things are your brain connections, memories, etc. You could change something that effects that area and then come out the other side physical fixed, but mentally no longer yourself.
 

Kevin

Code Monkey
Staff member
Joined
Mar 20, 2004
Location
Pennsylvania
#6
I've thought about this before myself, and I can honestly say that I would use it in a second. And while we're at it, why couldn't the copy be improved?

"Transport into a better you...today!"
But that's just it... it wouldn't be you but rather a copy of you. The "you" right now would end up going away.
 
Joined
Feb 1, 2008
#8
Said no...
firstly, I like who I am and that other person wouldn't be mean.
secondly, on concept - I don't see how the science works, where is the second machine that buts me back together? How do you deal with the loss of matter that is taken from the beamin location that is used to make the other me?

Makes nice science fiction, but little if any science fact.
 

Webster

The Red Tarheel
Joined
Dec 7, 2007
Location
Morganton, NC
#9
Knowing the risks with something like a "transporter", I'd still use it....after all, you only get one shot at life; you might as well go for it when you have the opportunity. :cool:
 
Joined
Feb 21, 2008
#10
You guys can test it for me for a while and let me know how it works. heh heh heh

I am all for fixing disabilities though. I loved home Star Trek could cure all diseases except Captain Picard's baldness.
 

Tom

An Old Friend
Joined
Dec 6, 2004
Location
Gulf Coast
#12
Just Found this article - It is COOLSCIFI!!

Beam Me Up, Scotty: Transporters Might Really Work: Book Review

March 25 (Bloomberg) -- The most precious substance on Earth isn't gold or platinum. It's antimatter, valued by physicist Michio Kaku at $62.5 trillion a gram.
Antimatter, which is like ordinary matter except with the charges of its subatomic particles reversed, powered spaceships in ``Star Trek'' and in real life is one possible key to allowing travel between planets or galaxies, Kaku writes in ``Physics of the Impossible.''
A professor at the City University of New York, Kaku appears to have read every major tract by Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg and Kurt Godel, plus a mountain of comic books and science-fiction novels. His own book assesses whether phasers, teleportation and other technologies used by Flash Gordon and Captain Kirk could really be developed.
Kaku is no stranger to his subject. In high school, he photographed antimatter tracks. He went on to become a pioneer of string field theory, which aspires to improve on Einstein in explaining the universe. He also wrote earlier science books aimed at the broader public, including ``Hyperspace.''
Kaku knows, and conveys, that both physics and science fiction are thrilling. In the beginning, the book is kind of a ``Whole Earth Catalog,'' or perhaps ``Whole Universe Catalog,'' of technologies. For each, Kaku describes how they appear in fiction, summarizes the relevant real-world science, and makes a prediction, albeit a loose one.
Cloaking Devices
``A form of invisibility may become commonplace'' within a century, if not a few decades, according to the author, who cites advances in nanotechnology and holograms. So-called metamaterials that make part of the light spectrum invisible already exist, possibly pointing the way to cloaking devices. But using the power of the unproven ``fourth dimension,'' the method favored by H.G. Wells's ``Invisible Man,'' isn't likely to pan out, according to Kaku.
The discussion of gadgets sometimes drags, and in later chapters the author wisely turns his attention to what's really fascinating in this enterprise: people and ideas. This is a book of enormous sweep, crammed with science and its history. His portraits of such figures as Erwin Schrodinger (of the fabled cat paradox in quantum mechanics) and Paul Dirac, the ``founder of antimatter,'' are immensely readable.
Seeing the Future
Some phenomena, such as precognition, or seeing the future, Kaku rules out as impossible under the known laws of physics. But he regards many other things that appear impossible today as likely to come about in thousands or millions of years.
The terms and concepts, arriving faster in later chapters, are often challenging. If you stop to ponder each idea too long, the book may have the effect of one of the so-called black holes in space discussed along the way: You may get in, but never get out. Otherwise, it's a rewarding trip.
``Physics of the Impossible: A Scientific Exploration Into the World of Phasers, Force Fields, Teleportation and Time Travel'' is published by Doubleday (329 pages, $26.95).
(Jeffrey Tannenbaum is an editor for Bloomberg News. The opinions expressed are his own.)
 

Mojo

Rocket Ranger
Joined
Jul 29, 2008
#14
Dan Simmons has a similar concept in Ilium/Olympos with "faxing"...

Spoiler!

I would definitely have some serious issues with that kind of "teleportation".
 

BirdOPrey5

Rocket Ranger
Joined
Jan 1, 2005
#15
Having just dealt with US Airways for a flight to and from Ohio for a wedding I can honestly say I'd use the transporter even if it was a copy of me that came out the other side AND the copy got kicked in the groin for good measure.
 

Kevin

Code Monkey
Staff member
Joined
Mar 20, 2004
Location
Pennsylvania
#16
Having just dealt with US Airways for a flight to and from Ohio for a wedding I can honestly say I'd use the transporter even if it was a copy of me that came out the other side AND the copy got kicked in the groin for good measure.
Ouch! Besides 'nickle & diming' you for everything, how else did they mess up your trip?
 

Mojo

Rocket Ranger
Joined
Jul 29, 2008
#17
Having just dealt with US Airways for a flight to and from Ohio for a wedding I can honestly say I'd use the transporter even if it was a copy of me that came out the other side AND the copy got kicked in the groin for good measure.


Which airline was it that said they were going to start charging for pillows and blankets???

(Off-topic but still incredible.)
 
Joined
Sep 19, 2008
#18
If a copy would be created of me, would then there be two seperate me's roaming on this planet? I don't know if I understood correctly or not.

Anyway, if there was only one me after the transporting and the ways of doing the transport wouldn't in any way damage or alter me but the method was exlusively efficient, I would do it. Not several times, though, because what the scientists say may not always be the truth. But the experience would be way too awesome to miss.

And in case there would be two seperate me made pending the transport, I would refuse. Even one me is enough for the world to stand, not to mention numerous.
 

Kevin

Code Monkey
Staff member
Joined
Mar 20, 2004
Location
Pennsylvania
#19
If a copy would be created of me, would then there be two seperate me's roaming on this planet? I don't know if I understood correctly or not.

Anyway, if there was only one me after the transporting and the ways of doing the transport wouldn't in any way damage or alter me but the method was exlusively efficient, I would do it. Not several times, though, because what the scientists say may not always be the truth. But the experience would be way too awesome to miss.

And in case there would be two seperate me made pending the transport, I would refuse. Even one me is enough for the world to stand, not to mention numerous.
There would only be one of you. Essentially in the scenario I described the transporter mechanism makes a copy of you and then destroys the original.
 
Joined
Mar 15, 2008
#20
With an exact copy, life goes on. Sure ... why not?
Heck of a way to do laundry, or do dirty clothes get duplicated smelly?
Or is new, all new? No bad breath, brushed teeth, showered body, shaved face, full stomach, clipped nails, combed hair, fresh clothes ...
 
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