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Fantasy The Hobbit Trilogy

Discussion in 'Movies' started by Tom, Jul 30, 2009.

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  1. Tom

    Tom An Old Friend

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    [movie]The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (tt0903624)[/movie]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 12, 2014
  2. Martian

    Martian Rocket Ranger

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    What did you all think about this film?
     
  3. Starbeast from Planet X

    Starbeast from Planet X Benevolent Galaxy Being

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    I loved it. I suppose there will be an Extended Edition of the movie released in the future on DVD and Blu ray. I'd buy it.
     
  4. Martian

    Martian Rocket Ranger

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    I liked it, but I preferred the Rankin Bass cartoon to be honest!
     
  5. Starbeast from Planet X

    Starbeast from Planet X Benevolent Galaxy Being

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    I stiil like that version too. And their version of Return of the King.

    In the Rankin Bass Hobbit version, I like when Bilbo encountered the Golem for the first time. Lot's of great scenes, including the talking spiders.
     
  6. Martian

    Martian Rocket Ranger

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    Yes, and the music was better too.
     
  7. Kemis

    Kemis Cadet

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    I liked it but I felt like they wanted to make it longer and longer...I could have cut out a few scenes and make it shorter, sometimes it's annoying...but overall: good movie and the new music theme is fantastic!
     
  8. Viktor Kuprin

    Viktor Kuprin Spaced Cadet Writer

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    B minus

    Way too many shots of Bilbo (Martin Freeman) mugging the camera. That got old fast. And stretching the story out into three films is just corporate-greedy.

    I, too, love the Rankin-Bass animated versions of The Hobbit and Return of the King. So many great voice actors but, sadly, it was the last or near last performances for some, like Hans Conreid, Otto Preminger, Brother Theodore, Richard Boone, Paul Frees, Glenn Yarbrough. We'd only see one more great Rankin-Bass animation after the Tolkien films: The Last Unicorn. Its haunting theme song by the group America is unforgettable.

    I'm fortunate to have this in my library, the illustrated coffee-table book from the animated Hobbit, filled with stills, character sketches and concept drawings used for the project:

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Martian

    Martian Rocket Ranger

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    Very nice!
     
  10. blackwarder

    blackwarder Cadet

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    I liked it a lot.

    I'm one of those Tolkien fans who accepted the fact that you can't copy past a book into a movie and I loved the LoTR trilogy, got all the extended edition movies.

    I can't wait until the directors cut version of the Hobbit will come out, do we have any eta on when it's going to happen?

    Warder
     
  11. Anthony G Williams

    Anthony G Williams Greybeard Writer

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2007
    Location:
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    Film: The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (2012)

    I have refrained from watching the first part of The Hobbit until now, since I don't like waiting a whole year between episodes – I forget too much of what happened. I plan to watch Part 2 in the autumn and if possible see the finale in a cinema on its release next winter.

    I was a huge fan of Tolkien's work in the 1960s, reading The Hobbit and then The Lord of the Rings for the first time when aged 11 or 12, then reading both stories every year for the next decade, during which time they achieved cult status. I haven't read either of them since, so my memories of the books are over forty years old. I did see the films of LOTR, which I much enjoyed, and plan to watch the extended versions after seeing the finale of The Hobbit.

    Although I recalled the general plot outline of The Hobbit well enough most of the details were fuzzy, so you needn't expect a nerdish analysis of how faithful the film is to the book. The production is superb and the film of high quality throughout, which is no more than I expected from Peter Jackson. Martin Freeman is excellent in the title role of the comfortable, middle-aged hobbit reluctantly persuaded into go on a dangerous adventure with a wizard and a bunch of pugnacious dwarves. The film is a visual feast and has a great deal to enjoy. I liked the restraint shown in building up the suspense concerning the dragon Smaug, only shown partly, in brief glimpses.

    In some respects – its visual richness and quality, and the relatively leisurely pace – I was reminded of Game of Thrones. However, while the long running time of both productions allows plenty of opportunity to tell the tales, in both cases there is perhaps too much time. I stopped watching GoT at the end of Season 3, partly because I found the story too relentlessly depressing, but partly because of its lack of pace: I accidentally missed one of the episodes and didn't even realise that until much later, since it had barely moved the plot forward at all. Unlike LOTR, in which 1,000 pages of novel were crammed into nine hours of filming, The Hobbit is a simple tale of well under 300 pages yet is stretched over a similar running time. One of the consequences is that some of the scenes are too extended. By the end, I did get tired of the endless running battles with Orcs and Wargs, and feel that the film would have been better for some judicious editing to reduce its length. However, I am still looking forward to the next episode.


    (This entry is cross-posted from my science-fiction & fantasy blog.)
     
  12. Alien Soup

    Alien Soup Head Chef

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    [MOVIE]The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies (tt2310332)[/MOVIE]
     
  13. Biorider

    Biorider Ensign

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    Whoah. This reminds me. I'd missed the second one. Gotta catch up.
     
  14. Kevin

    Kevin Code Monkey Staff Abductee

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    I am so far behind... I haven't even watched the first Hobbit yet! :(
     
  15. Biorider

    Biorider Ensign

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    Looks like we both have catching up to do. Good luck with yours.
     
  16. Anthony G Williams

    Anthony G Williams Greybeard Writer

    Joined:
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    Location:
    UK
    Films: The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug (2013), and The Battle of the Five Armies (2014)

    I reviewed Part 1 of The Hobbit in July this year, in which I said the following:

    Although I recalled the general plot outline of The Hobbit well enough most of the details were fuzzy, so you needn't expect a nerdish analysis of how faithful the film is to the book. The production is superb and the film of high quality throughout, which is no more than I expected from Peter Jackson. Martin Freeman is excellent in the title role of the comfortable, middle-aged hobbit reluctantly persuaded into go on a dangerous adventure with a wizard and a bunch of pugnacious dwarves. The film is a visual feast and has a great deal to enjoy. I liked the restraint shown in building up the suspense concerning the dragon Smaug, only shown partly, in brief glimpses.

    Unlike LOTR, in which 1,000 pages of novel were crammed into nine hours of filming, The Hobbit is a simple tale of well under 300 pages yet is stretched over a similar running time. One of the consequences is that some of the scenes are too extended. By the end, I did get tired of the endless running battles with Orcs and Wargs, and feel that the film would have been better for some judicious editing to reduce its length. However, I am still looking forward to the next episode.

    Rather to my surprise, I enjoyed the second film more than the first. I usually find that middle films of trilogies suffer through having no proper beginning or ending, but didn't find that a problem here. There is less emphasis on scene-setting, and I did not get the same impression of scenes being over-extended; the story rattles along at a good pace and with a fair amount of variety. The dragon, seen in all its glory, is a marvellous creation, fully living up to expectations. Martin Freeman consolidates his solid performance as the reluctant hero and there are also notable performances from Richard Armitage as Thorin and Evangeline Lilly as the elf Tauriel (a character who isn't in the book, but I'm certainly not complaining). Orlando Bloom reprises his LOTR role of Legolas the elf, and Ian McKellen makes an impressive Gandalf. The film finishes on a note of high drama as Smaug flies to Laketown, setting up the final episode.

    ************************

    Now that I've located a nearby IMAX that's convenient to drive to, I travelled to see the final episode in all its 3D glory. It continues immediately from where the second film ended, with Smaug's attack on Laketown, then spends most of the rest of the time on the Battle of the Five Armies, as the title suggests. It is not, however, all about fighting. There is a strong focus on the growing madness of Thorin, more also on the rather unlikely added romantic sub-plot featuring the elf Tauriel and the dwarf Kili (but again, no complaints; Tauriel is definitely the girl you want by your side should you happen to encounter any stray bands of orcs in your neighbourhood), and perhaps not enough of the humorous scenes involving the down-to-earth Bilbo Baggins. Cate Blanchett is magnificent – she was born to play Galadriel – and it was good to see Christopher Lee as Saruman.

    Having said that, the battle is very dramatic and varied, with some intriguing monsters on show, although I had a problem in reconciling the serried ranks of drilled elvish warriors with the magical display of agility in combat by the principal elves – the two didn't seem to belong to the same culture. The 3D is really good in this film; it is subtle enough not to be obvious, without things leaping out of the screen at you, but adds a depth to the view which is definitely worthwhile.

    One oddity caught my attention concerning pronunciation. For more than half a century I have assumed that Smaug was pronounced "smorg" and Sauron was "sore-ron", but in the film these are "smowg" and sow-ron" respectively.

    To summarise the series, while purists will grumble that the film is merely "based on" the book and adds quite a few plot elements, it is close enough to what I remembered and adheres to the spirit of Tolkien's story. Definitely one which fantasy fans should not miss, unless you are allergic to Middle Earth. Now I must watch The Lord of the Rings again, for the first time since that series was released.


    (This entry is cross-posted from my science-fiction & fantasy blog.)
     
  17. spacepilotsshow

    spacepilotsshow Scout

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    Dec 3, 2014
    So the overall vibe I'm getting is: good, but not the best in the franchise

    This upsets me because I was hoping it would be :( I don't want to go in the theater with low expectations though
     

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